Students assess the benefits of campus trees for an Undergraduate Research Project

 Everyone enjoys the shade of campus trees during a hot summer day, but can we quantify their benefits? This summer, four Texas A&M students (Cody Franklin, Marco Minor, Kenneth Evans, and Alex Pharmakis) walked around the A&M Campus estimating the effects that trees have on campus buildings and the surrounding environment. The work was part of the Aggie Research Scholars program, which provides undergraduate students with the funds and guidance to complete legitimate research projects. The data they gathered was put into a U.S. Forest Service program that gave them the results they needed, including energy savings and carbon storage, and they found that trees have much more of an effect on the quality of human life than most people might think. For more information, email Cody Franklin at c-frank@tamu.edu. The students were mentored by PhD student Eboni Hall and Dr. Jason Vogel, and Dr. Astrid Volder in the horticulture department loaned the students a heat sensing camera.

Students assess the benefits of campus trees for an Undergraduate Research Project