Four students going to Weyerhaeuser for Summer 2014 Internships

Weyerhaeuser returned to the department of Ecosystem Science and Management for the 5th year to choose summer interns. This is the most internship offered to students from any one university. They are John McNeil, Amanda Brooks, Samantha Wallace, and Chase Brooke.

Please view their bios:  http://essm.tamu.edu/people/interns/

Weyerhaeuser is a Weyerhaeuser Company, one of the world's largest private owners of timberlands operation. They own or control nearly 7 million acres of timberlands, primarily in the U.S., and manage another 14 million acres under long-term licenses in Canada. They manage these timberlands on a sustainable basis in compliance with internationally recognized forestry standards. They are also one of the largest manufacturers of wood and cellulose fibers products, and develop real estate, primarily as a builder of single-family homes. Weyerhaeuser is a real estate investment trust. In 2013, they generated $8.5 billion in sales and employed approximately 13,700 people who serve customers worldwide.

One of the Weyerhaeuser team members was Miguel Villarreal, a graduate of ESSM with a degree in Spatial Sciences.  He was a summer intern in 2011 and was hired the following May after graduation.

Miguel  sent a photo and a comment about his experience of coming back to Aggieland and being on the other side of the table.

 “I was very proud of all the applicants and received positive feedback from others at Weyerhaeuser about the quality of the candidates who interviewed.  I hope more companies continue to come to the department of Ecosystem Science and Management to continue to give Aggies the opportunity to succeed.  I am sure that all four candidates selected will work hard and continue to represent the department well.”

Miguel Villarreal

Miguel Villarreal shared one of his days at Weyerhaeuser with us.

The helicopter photo was taken during a three-day flight of locating Bald Eagles by helicopter in order to create wildlife buffer protection zones.  On day two of this project my background in Spatial Sciences came in handy when the pilot locator files would not locate properly.  Being the youngest one in the group I was volunteered to reproject the locator files on the spot.  Luckily I was able to project the shapefiles to the right projection and get us flying in the right direction towards the rest of the possible nest locations.

 

Jamie Hughes has been part of the recruitment team since 2010 said  “Our visit to Texas A&M each year is one of the most enjoyable recruiting trips we go on.  The faculty and staff go above and beyond to make our stay not only comfortable but productive.  The education the students are receiving at Texas A&M in my opinion prepares them well for a career in forest industry.  The proof can be seen from the current employees that we have hired from Texas A&M.  I have personally worked with most of them and believe they have a great career ahead of them.  We also have a new crop of interns coming in this summer, and I have no reason not to expect the same.  I look forward to many more recruiting trips to Aggieland.

 

 

 

THANK YOU WEYERHAEUSER